Steam Soundz

Rolling Stock
 

Here you'll find the cars and other rolling stock I've created for use in Trainz Simulator. 

You can download all of these files from the Trainz Download Station (DLS). 

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Civil War Era Cars

Civil War Era Archroof Box Car - W & A (Gray) #301

 
A gray colored box car, lettered for the Western & Atlantic Railroad (W&A), numbered #301. This is a freelance model of an early box car with a canvas covered, arched roof, from the era of the America Civil War (1861-1865) based on historic photographs and dimensional data of various cars from the period. Similar cars were also in use during the 1850s through the 1870s. The variety used and actual location of crew-conveniences used on box cars, such as brakes, ladders, steps, etc., varied during the period. Standard car building standards and practices weren't in common use in the U.S. until the 1870s.

Civil War Era Archroof Box Car - W & A (Yellow) #110

 
A yellow colored box car, lettered for the Western & Atlantic Railroad (W&A) -- colors chosen to match W&A passenger cars by Pencil42 (carsoncarshops.com). This is a freelance model of an early box car with a canvas covered, arched roof, from the era of the America Civil War (1861-1865) based on historic photographs and dimensional data of various cars from the period. Similar cars were also in use during the 1850s through the 1870s. Early box cars were often less than 32' in overall length to avoid the expensive of using (iron) truss rods. During the war, iron became scarce, and thus many of cars built were by both North and South were of the short, 'truss-less' kind. The variety used and actual location of crew-conveniences used on box cars, such as brakes, ladders, steps, etc., varied during the period. Standard car building standards and practices weren't in common use in the U.S. until the 1870s.

Civil War Era Archroof Boxcar - W & A (Gray) #101

 
A gray colored box car, lettered for the Western & Atlantic Railroad (W&A). This is a freelance model of an early box car with a canvas covered, arched roof, from the era of the America Civil War (1861-1865) based on historic photographs and dimensional data of various cars from the period. Similar cars were also in use during the 1850s through the 1870s. Early box cars were often less than 32' in overall length to avoid the expensive of using (iron) truss rods. During the war, iron became scarce, and thus many of cars built were by both North and South were of the short, 'truss-less' kind. The variety used and actual location of crew-conveniences used on box cars, such as brakes, ladders, steps, etc., varied during the period. Standard car building standards and practices weren't in common use in the U.S. until the 1870s.

Civil War Era Conductor's Car - W & A (Gray)

 
A conductor's car was an early name for a caboose car. This particular car uses a gray paint scheme, and is a freelance model of an conductor's car with a canvas covered, arched roof, from the era of the America Civil War (1861-1865) based on historic photographs and dimensional data of various cars from the period. Early caboose cars were typically 'one of a kind', each fashioned from whatever box car might be available by the railroad's car builder shops -- the variety used and actual location of crew-conveniences such as doors, windows, ladders, steps, etc. varied during the period.

Civil War Era Conductor's Car - W & A (Boxcar Red)

 
A conductor's car was an early name for a caboose car. This is a freelance model of an conductor's car with a canvas covered, arched roof, from the era of the America Civil War (1861-1865) based on historic photographs and dimensional data of various cars from the period. Early caboose cars were typically 'one of a kind', each fashioned from whatever box car might be available by the railroad's car builder shops -- the variety used and actual location of crew-conveniences such as doors, windows, ladders, steps, etc. varied during the period.
 

1850-1870 Era Woodbeam Truck (With Brakes)

 
Standard-gauge U.S. Civil War era wood-frame/woodbeam truck (bogey), w/33-in. wheels. This truck is modeled from a 1863 design used on the Pennsylvania Railroad. Note: Freight cars of the era typically were equipped with brakes on only one truck. This Trainz model truck is equipped with (manual) brake -- kuid 123250:10015 is the matching version of this truck WITHOUT brake.

1850-1870 Era Woodbeam Truck (Without Brakes)

 
Standard-gauge U.S. Civil War era wood-frame/woodbeam truck (bogey), w/33-in. wheels. This standard gauge truck is modeled from a 1863 design used on the Pennsylvania Railroad. Note: Freight cars of the era typically were equipped with brakes on only one truck. This truck is NOT equipped with brake -- kuid 123250:10014 is the matching version of this truck WITH brake.
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